Friday, June 23, 2017

Creation and Process of "Vivaciousness"

Vivaciousness by Maria Doering


Earlier this year I carved "Vivaciousness", a reductive linocut that was intended for a print exchange, as so often once I decide I needed an exact number of perfect prints in an edition, I ran into all sorts of technical difficulties. It turned out there was a dent in this block which was causing havoc. It took quite a bit of improvising to not have it appear in each print, and eventually I worked it out. A few of these prints have already found new homes. If you are interested in adopting one of them, please visit: http://maria-doering.com/shop/vivaciousness/



The first layer always starts with a drawing to work out the initial shape of the carving. 
This drawing happens with permanent marker directly on the block of linoleum. 



After carving the initial layer I clean the block to remove as much of the permanent marker as possible as the Akua ink is notorious for picking up any left over marks. 


The dented block made the printing of this linocut a lot more challenging. The white smudge on the left is where the dent is in the block. 




Layer 2 carved and inked.


Layer 2 printed, the dented spot is slowly disappearing. 


Layer 3 carved and inked. 


Layer 3 printed.


Layer 4 carved and inked. 


Layer 4 printed. 


Layer 5 carved and inked. 


Layer 5 printed. 


Layer 6 carved and inked. 


Layer 6 printed. 


Layer 7 carved and inked. 


Layer 7 printed.


Layer 8 carved and inked.



And finally the print is finished. In the end I only had 9 prints that were useable for the edition. But I was very happy with each of those 9. 




I also as per usually print a few of them on eastern paper for my exhibition in September. 


Fun fact, sometimes I make a big mistake... on the very last layer. 
In this instance the mistake was that I placed the block upside down into my registration jig. Sometimes mistakes can create very interesting unexpected effects, which is what makes me hold on to this print despite the error.

Fascinated by this process and the results? Adopt a Print, Feed a Printmaker!

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